Everything you need to know about osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis is a potentially painful condition that leads to inflammation, loss of cartilage, and bone damage. Read our article to find out how it happens and what treatments can help. Also, see a fully interactive 3-D model that you can explore to look inside a joint when signs of osteoarthritis begin to appear. Read now
Try Atrogel: Atrogel is amazing when it comes to soothing and easing pain, helping to relieve muscle aches, stiffness and bruising. It’s prepared using extracts of fresh arnica flowers and can be applied up to 4 times a day! Suitable for pregnant women and children, simply apply this lovely non-greasy formula to the affected area for some much-needed relief!
Honestly, I am new to a lot of this stuff, so I am definitely not an expert on the subject. However, I have been doing some research on the matter, and it seems most people recommend stretching the opposing muscle group in such cases. For example, if you injured your hamstring, you would stretch your thigh. You would also want to stretch the surrounding muscle groups, seeing as how our entire body is fit together, so that every part of your body affects every other part. I realize that by now you are probably back to skating, but for anyone else who reads this and has a similar issue, I would still suggest looking into it a bit, as, like I said, I am new to a lot of stuff (PE was about as far as I got when it came to exercise, until almost two months ago, when I found crossfit), but at least it’s a start.
Moist heat may help relax your muscles. Put moist heat on the sore area for 10 to 15 minutes at a time before you do warm-up and stretching exercises. Moist heat includes heat patches or moist heating pads that you can buy at most drugstores, a wet washcloth or towel that has been heated in a microwave or the dryer, or a hot shower. Don’t use heat if you have swelling.
Low back pain (LBP) is a common disorder involving the muscles, nerves, and bones of the back.[4] Pain can vary from a dull constant ache to a sudden sharp feeling.[4] Low back pain may be classified by duration as acute (pain lasting less than 6 weeks), sub-chronic (6 to 12 weeks), or chronic (more than 12 weeks).[3] The condition may be further classified by the underlying cause as either mechanical, non-mechanical, or referred pain.[5] The symptoms of low back pain usually improve within a few weeks from the time they start, with 40–90% of people completely better by six weeks.[2]
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